La table d’honneur de la première rencontre de l’Amicale des Alouettes

Table d'honneur - 16-11-1946

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

Table d'honneur - 16-11-1946~7~2

image

image

image

image

image

5 réflexions sur “La table d’honneur de la première rencontre de l’Amicale des Alouettes

  1. Les Powell

    http://www.cbc.ca/archives/entry/the-bombing-of-dresden

    The firebombing of Dresden, Germany in February 1945 sets the city ablaze, and would become one of the most controversial attacks of the Second World War. But as we hear in these wartime reports from CBC Radio, at the time of the bombing Allied forces are simply glad to see another part of the German war machine crippled. In the first part of this report, which aired on Feb. 14, 1945, RCAF Squadron Leader Les Powell describes the logistics of the Dresden attack. In the second part, which aired two days later, Powell interviews Flight Sergeant Frank Bramley, a Lancaster gunner who participated in the Dresden bombings. He describes the aerial view of the fires raging along the Eastern Front as « the finest sight I’ve ever seen » – proof positive that victory is in sight at last.

  2. Hector Payette

    https://425alouette.wordpress.com/2014/03/30/a-lheure-du-midi-le-thermometre-atteignait-130-et-meme-140-f/

    Concernant la santé physique de nos troupes, nous n’avons que des éloges à l’endroit de notre service médical. Ce service était régi par le docteur Hector Payette, le « petit doc», qui, malgré sa petite taille, a toujours su se montrer à la hauteur de la situation. C’est lui qui a réussi à nous guérir de la dysenterie qui nous a tous affectés au début, en nous gavant d’huile de ricin par l’intermédiaire d’un entonnoir placé dans la bouche de ses patients. C’est également lui qui veillait à l’administration des comprimés de quinine et d’atabrine contre la malaria, et des «mottons» de sel pour combattre la déperdition d’eau par la sueur. Et combien de cas d’insolation a-t-il été appelé à traiter! Sans compter les soins aux blessés, comme ce fut le cas pour le sergent Léon Roberge, un sans-filiste qui est revenu d’un raid avec un éclat d’obus dans la cuisse et des balles de mitrailleuse dans les mollets, suite à une rencontre inopinée avec un Junkers 88.

  3. https://rcaf403squadron.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/squadron-leader-claude-hc3a9bert.jpg?w=921&h=533

    HEBERT, S/L Rosario Jean Claude (C1469) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.425 Squadron – Award effective 11 April 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 April 1944 and AFRO 1075/44 dated 19 May 1944. Born 1914, Magog, Quebec; home there. Enlisted Trois Rivieres,, Quebec, 2 January 1940. Trained at No.1 SFTS (graduated 13 July 1940). No citation other than “…completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.1730 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20607) has recommendation dated 15 December 1943 at which time he had flown 39 sorties (222 hours 25 minutes):

    This officer has now completed thirty-nine night sorties on a variety of targets. He has carried out these attacks with consistent skill and courage. Squadron Leader Hebert has set an example of skilful pilotage, cool judgement and determination. This, along with his cheerful confidence, has inspired a high standard of morale in his crew.

  4. C.M. Mcewen

    http://esask.uregina.ca/entry/mcewen_clifford_mackay_1896-_1967.html

    Air Vice-Marshal Clifford McEwen was born at Griswold, Manitoba on July 2, 1896, and raised in Moose Jaw. After receiving his education at the UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN, he enlisted in the 196th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force in 1916. Becoming an officer shortly after arriving in England, McEwen was assigned to Britain’s Royal Flying Corps, where he learned to fly. As a member of No. 28 Squadron, RFC, in Italy during 1918, he was credited with shooting down 22 enemy aircraft, making him an “Ace.” For his wartime service, McEwen was awarded the Military Cross, the Distinguished Flying Cross with Bar, and the Italian Bronze Medal for Valour. During the interwar years, McEwen was a flying instructor; in 1930 he attended the Royal Air Force Staff College at Cranwell, Lincolnshire. At the outbreak of WORLD WAR II in 1939, he was a Group Captain stationed at Trenton, Ontario. In 1941, McEwen was promoted to Air Commodore and given command of the Royal Canadian Air Force’s No. 1 Group at St. John’s, Newfoundland, which was then waging a vital war against German U-boats in the North Atlantic. Promoted to Air Vice-Marshal, he was appointed Air Officer Commanding No. 6 (Bomber) Group in Yorkshire, England on February 28, 1944. This was a critical point in the strategic air offensive against Germany, and McEwen quickly established a rigorous training program, resulting in increased combat efficiency and reduced casualty rates. When the European war ended, he was designated commander of the Canadian bomber group to be sent to the Pacific Theatre to fight against the Japanese, but with the collapse of Japan in August 1945 the plan was scrapped. McEwen retired from the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1946 and became a private consultant to aircraft manufacturers. For two years he was a director of Trans-Canada Air Lines, the predecessor of Air Canada. McEwen died on August 6, 1967, aged 71; he is buried in Fund’s Field of Honour, Pointe Claire, Quebec. On June 17, 2003, 15 WING MOOSE JAW was renamed Air Vice-Marshal C.M. McEwen Airfield, the first Canadian Forces airfield to be named in honour of a Canadian military aviation legend.

    Jeff R. Noel

  5. Air Vice Marshall Clifford MacKay McEwen is considered to be one of the most decorated senior officers of the Second World War. From December 1917 to October 1918, while serving with No. 28 Squadron during the First World War, McEwen destroyed a total of 22 enemy aircraft. In honor of his efforts he was awarded the Military Cross on May 17, 1918, the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) on June 14, 1918, and the Bar to the DFC shortly after. Additionally, he was awarded the Italian Bronze Medal for valor on November 2, 1918. Following the Kaiser War he joined the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and eventually rose to the rank of Air Vice Marshall in March 1944. From this time until the end of WWII, McEwen commanded the No. 6 Bomber Group in Yorkshire. During this time he is noted for conducting flights over Germany with his men despite the disapproval of his superior officers. He retired to Toronto in 1945 where he later died on August 6, 1967.

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s