BROUSSEAU, P/O Joseph Henri Normand (J17601) – Distinguished Flying Cross

C’est le capitaine de l’équipage du sans-filiste Jean Fontaine.

Le Sergent Norm Brosseau du Cap-de-la-Madeleine était notre Capitaine et j’étais debout derrière lui dans la cabine de pilotage lorsqu’il mit les gaz à fond. Nous commencions à prendre de la vitesse et nous avions déjà parcouru la moitié de la piste lorsque je remarquai que le Capitaine regardait le moteur à tribord avec inquiétude.

Voici la citation pour sa DFC.

J’ai ajouté les deux photos du document. On y raconte le crash.

BROUSSEAU, P/O Joseph Henri Normand (J17601)

– Distinguished Flying Cross

– No.425 Squadron

– Award effective 21 October 1943 as per London Gazette dated 29 October 1943 and AFRO 2457/43 dated 26 November 1943.

Born September 1921. Home at Cap de la Madeleine; enlisted Montreal, 29 May 1941 and posted to No.4 Manning Depot. To No.3 ITS, 8 August 1941; graduated and promoted LAC, 25 September 1941 when posted to No.4 EFTS; graduated 20 November 1941 when posted to No.9 SFTS; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 10 April 1942.

To “Y” Depot, 11 April 1942.

To RAF overseas, 30 April 1942. Award sent by registered mail 30 September 1948. Rejoined RCAF Auxiliary in Montreal, 10 October 1949 as pilot, No.438 Squadron (110148); retired 2 March 1954.

Pilot Officer Brousseau as captain of aircraft has participated in a large number of successful sorties at night against heavily defended targets in German and Italian territory. Throughout his operational career this officer has been conspicuous for his devotion to duty and his exceptional coolness and courage in hazardous circumstances.

Note:

Incident with Wellington BJ918 at Dishforth airfield. On 28th February 1943 the crew of this aircraft were in the process of taking off for an operational flight to St.Nazaire when the starboard engine failed on take off. The pilot made a rough landing near, what was then known as, Dishforth Crossroads, around a mile south of the airfield at 18.05hrs.

crash Wellington Fontaine

The crew escaped injury and the bomb load did not explode.

crash Wellington Fontaine bombe 4000

Pilot – Sgt Joseph Henry Normand Brousseau RCAF, of Cap de Madeleine, Quebec, Canada;

Navigator – Sgt J H Moreau RCAF (Possibly Gerald or Jerry Moreau RCAF);

Wireless Operator – Sgt John D L Fontaine/Fontain RCAF, of Rosemount, Quebec, Canada;

Bomb Aimer or Wireless Operator, F/O Dennis Bertram James Hodgetts RAFVR (123849), of Birmingham;

Air Gunner , Sgt Joseph Alfred Henri Bernard “Ben” Marceau RCAF, of Montreal, Quebec, Canada;

Air Gunner or Bomb Aimer – P/O Thomas Robert Clifford « Cliff » Irwin RCAF (J/22523), of St. Boniface, Manitoba, Canada.

Pas grand chose me direz-vous dans cette citation.

On verra bien les renseignements que je pourrai en tirer.

Pour me contacter, écrivez un commentaire ou utilisez le formulaire suivant.

 

6 réflexions sur “BROUSSEAU, P/O Joseph Henri Normand (J17601) – Distinguished Flying Cross

  1. I am the daughter of RCAF Pilot J.H. Normand Brousseau, Pilot and member of the 425 Squadron. His crew was composed of the following:

    F. Rowan – Wireless Operator
    J. Moreau – Navigator
    D. Hodgetts – Bomb Aimer
    H. Marceau – Rear Gunner

    He is the pilot that crashed a Wellington on takeoff, February 28, 1943 carrying a 4000 lb. bomb referred to as « block buster » with his crew on board.

    I don’t believe the Jerry or Gerry Moreau listed on this site was the Jerry Moreau of his crew because the dates attributed the Moreau on this site do not correspond to the dates in my father’s « Pilot’s Flying Log Book » which has entries from the start of his training Sept. 25, 1941 to his first sortie Dec. 6, 1943, and his last sortie Aug. 2, 1943. He performed 34 DCO sorties before becoming a flight instructor Oct. 11, 1943, in Pershore, England.

    Please feel free to contact me if you would like more information.

  2. Wellington BJ918 at Dishforth airfield.

    On 28th February 1943 the crew of this aircraft were in the process of taking off for an operational flight to St.Nazaire when the starboard engine failed on take off. The pilot made a rough landing near, what was then known as, Dishforth Crossroads, around a mile south of the airfield at 18.05hrs. The crew escaped injury but the bomb load did not explode.

    Pilot – Sgt Joseph Henry Normand Brousseau RCAF, of Cap de Madeleine, Quebec, Canada.

    Navigator – Sgt « J H Moreau RCAF » (Possibly Gerald or Jerry Moreau RCAF).

    Wireless Operator – Sgt John D L Fontaine/Fontain RCAF, of Rosemount, Quebec, Canada.

    Bomb Aimer or Wireless Operator – F/O Dennis Bertram James Hodgetts RAFVR (123849), of Birmingham.

    Air Gunner – Sgt Joseph Alfred Henri Bernard “Ben” Marceau RCAF, of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

    Air Gunner or Bomb Aimer – P/O Thomas Robert Clifford « Cliff » Irwin RCAF (J/22523), of St.Boniface, Manitoba, Canada.
    « Ben » Marceau was later posted to 434 Squadron. On 11th March 1945 he was flying Ops to Essen in Lancaster KB834 when the aircraft was shot down by flak over the target area. He was the sole survivor but sustained serious injuries and spent the rest of the war in hospitals until being liberated, he was flown to England and treated at East Grinstead for his burns in what became known as the Guinea Pig hospital. He later returned home to Canada and died in December 2008. Dennis Hodgetts was born in the West Bromwich area of Birmingham in 1922. He received his commission on 29th June 1942 to the rank of P/O on probation (emergency), he was promoted to F/O on probation (war subs) on 29th December 1942, F/Lt (war subs) on 29th June 1944. He also married in the Smethwick area of Warwickshire in 1944 and died in the Bromsgrove area of Birmingham in 2005. It is possible he was a relation of Dennis Hodgetts, Aston Villa and England footballer in the late 1800s. On 14th/15th April 1943 P/O Irwin was flying in Wellington HE733 on Ops to Stuttgart when the aircraft failed to return to base he was on the run for a month before being taken prisoner of war. Joseph Brousseau was born in September 1921 and was living in Cap de la Madeleine when he enlisted in Montreal on 29th May 1941. was later commissioned and awarded the DFC for service with 425 Squadron, Gazetted on 29th October 1943. The citation reads..  »

    « Pilot Officer Brousseau as captain of aircraft has participated in a large number of successful sorties at night against heavily defended targets in German and Italian territory. Throughout his operational career this officer has been conspicuous for his devotion to duty and his exceptional coolness and courage in hazardous circumstances. »

    He was not awarded it while serving in Europe and his DFC was posted to him in Canada in 1948. Although he initially left the RCAF after the War he rejoined the RCAF Auxiliary in Montreal in 1949 as pilot, and served with 438 Squadron before finally retiring in 1954.

    • J’ai trouvé finalement, mais je n’ai pas eu le temps d’écrire un article encore… Les informations et les demandes de renseignements fusent.

      Qui êtes-vous pour en savoir tant sur ce navigateur?

    • Times Colonist [Victoria, B.C] 26 July 2003: E.1.

      MOREAU — Dr. Joseph Hubert died peacefully on July 23, 2003 at 7:30 pm after several days spent in joyful anticipation of meeting his Lord,
      surrounded by his loved ones.

      He is survived by his loving wife of 58 years, Mary, his eleven children and their spouses, 30 grandchildren, six great-grandchildren,
      and his sisters Marielle Paquin and Madeleine (Hugh) McMeel.

      His children are Mary-Lu Lorenson, Yvonne (Paul) Kennedy, Jerry (Susan) Moreau, Jeannine Moreau (Frank Van Zandwijk),
      Daniel (Mary) Moreau, Joseph (Lynn) Moreau, Jacques (Sandra) Moreau, Suzanne Moreau (Todd Nakazawa), Lise (Kevin) O’Reilly,
      Philippe (Michaela) Moreau, and Rev. Paul Moreau L.C.

      Joseph was born in Pointe Claire, Quebec in 1916 and grew up in St. Norbert, Manitoba.

      He was an original employee of Kleyson Transport, driving trucks from the age of 17.

      He served in the Alouettes squadron of the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War II as a navigator from 1941,
      stationed in North Africa and England. He returned in 1944 to marry and to begin post- secondary studies, obtaining a
      Doctor of Dental Surgery from McGill University in 1953, by which time he and Mary had six children.

      The family moved to Victoria in 1953, where Joseph established a flourishing dental practice and five more children arrived.

      He was well-known for his gold work, using his artistry to make people comfortable.

      After retirement in 1984, he hardly slowed down, driving night and day for Oak Bay Volunteers and making pallets from scrap

      lumber in his workshop. He was a longstanding member of St. Patrick’s Parish, where he was also a charter member of the

      Knights of Columbus, and is well remembered by parishioners who attend daily Mass there, for his faithful presence and his

      long chats afterward. Joseph’s last months were spent at Oak Bay Lodge, where, in March, he had the joy to hear Mass said

      by his youngest child, Paul, ordained a priest in Rome on December 24, 2002.

      Mass of Christian Burial will take place at St. Patrick’s Church at 2060 Haultain Street at 12:10 PM on July 29, 2003.

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