Lucien Marcotte DFC et son bomb aimer Reynald Poirier DFC

Qui se souvient du sans-filiste de Lucien Marcotte?

RCAF 425 Les Alouettes

Lucien Marcotte était le grand ami d’Antoine Brassard. C’est sa fille Danielle qui me l’avait dit en 2010.

Papa - Aviation - Bang On copy

collection Danielle Brassard

Si je me souviens bien, Antoine Brassard était aussi un grand ami de Jean-Marie Desmarais.

Jean-Marie Desmarais

collection Claude Desmarais

Antoine Brassard était en permission quand son ami est mort dans l’écrasement de son Halifax en décollant le 18 décembre 1944. Je reviendrai sur cet accident une prochaine fois…

Qu’en est-il de Lucien Marcotte, un autre ami d’Antoine Brassard. Lucien Marcotte a survécu à la guerre.

JLA Marcotte 1949

MARCOTTE, F/O Joseph Louis Albert Lucien (J86833) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.425 Squadron – Award effective 12 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 471/45 dated 16 March 1945. Born 1915 in Montreal; home there;enlisted there, 11 June 1942. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 19 March 1943), No.11 EFTS (graduated 14 May 1943) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 3 September 1943)…

View original post 591 mots de plus

SQUADRON COLORS CONSEGRATED

SQUADRON COLORS CONSEGRATED

Former members of the famed Alouette (425) Squadron gathered last night in 410 Auxiliary Fighter Squadron headquarters on Sherbrooke street west for a solemn ceremony of consecration of colors. Presented by Norman J. Dawes to Group Capt. J. M. St. Pierre, shown in the above photo shaking bands, the group, from left to right are: Paul Giguere, Flt. Lt. J. Decosse, Rev. Father Sqdn. Ldr. C. A. Metayer, Group Capt. St. Pierre, Mr. Dawes, Flt. Lt. Decourcy H. Rayner, and J. P. Lamontagne. More than 300 persons attended the solem dedication rites and participated in the informal get-together later in the officers’ mess of 401 Squadron.

(Gazette Photo by Davidson)

IMG_9867Jacques P Lamontagne

Nous avons maintenant la réponse à la question : Où cette photo de la collection de Jacques P. Lamontagne avait été prise?

IMG_4641~2

Alouette Squadron Given Colors In Impressive Dedication Rite

In an impressive ceremony, marked by the slow roll of drums, the Last Post and Reveille, the colors of the Alouettes Club were dedicated last night with Rev. Sqdn. Ldr. Father C. A. Metayer, O.P. Dominican, and Flt. Lt. Rev. Decourcy H. Rayner, officiating

« The very high honor conferred upon us tonight, » Group Capt. J. M. St. Pierre, D.F.C., A.F.C., president of the club, said, « creates a precedent, which I believe, is the first time in the history of the R.C.A.F., that a squadron, or more precisely, a club composed of former – members of a wartime operational squadron, is presented with colors. »;

Members of the famed 425 Alouette Squadron stood to attention as the official presentation was made by Flt. Lt. Joe Decosse, acting on behalf of Norman J. Dawes, president and managing director of the National Breweries, Ltd., who donated the colors to the association.

Following the presentation of colors and the sounding of Last Post, one minute’s silence was observed by the large gathering which thronged the headquarters of 401 Auxiliary Fighter Squadron on Sherbrooke street west.

Then, President St. Pierre quoted the poem:

« They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old,
« Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn,
« At the going down of the sun, and in the morning,
« We will remember them. »

As the words ended, the gathering was silent. The bugle notes of Reveille broke the silence. The notes faded, and the assembiy sang the hymn, « O God Our Help in Ages Past. »

« It will be with extreme pride that we hoist these colors at all official ceremonies, » Group Capt. St. Pierre said, « ‘To every one of us, they represent the spirit that once moved us to rally behind the squadron and they represent our esprit-de-corps and friendshlp.

« They represent also the friendship born amidst the sound of bombs and machine guns, and I would be remiss in my duty if I did not make reference to our boys who did not return—for they, too, must share our pride. »

Color bearers were J. P. Lamontagne, and Paul Giguere.

More than 300 persons attended the ceremony, and later participated in an informal get-together in the officers mess at 401 squadron headquarters.

IMG_4641~2

Who remembers Roland Laporte DFC with bar ?

Here

Joseph Serge Yvan Roland Laporte DFC (2) was born in Montreal, and on September 8, 1939, enlisted in the RCAF there. He graduated as a pilot, on August 20,1941, from No. 6. Service Flying Training School at Dunnville, Ontario.

After some time on duty in Canada he was posted overseas to the UK and after receiving further training was posted to No. 425 (Alouette) Squadron, Bomber Command.

For Bomber Command air crew, there was a low probability of surviving and returning safely, from all of their tour of 30 missions over enemy held Europe. Over 60 per cent of air crew who began a tour of 30 missions would lose their lives before completing the 30 missions.

Regardless of the terrible odds, bomber crews buckled on their parachutes and began each mission with determination. They fell prey to the hazards of fog, icing and lightning, and they perished amongst the bursting shells of anti-aircraft guns.

However, the greatest number died in the desperately unequal combat and the overwhelming firepower of tenacious German night fighter defenders. Over 9,900 Canadians in Bomber Command air crew, sacrificed their lives fighting for freedom and against dictatorship and autocracy.

On each bombing mission there were many who crashed after being hit by flak or enemy fighter action. Some airmen survived the crashes, others were rescued at sea, and some were taken prisoner.

A great many of those who died never had a chance to bail out. They perished when their aircraft loaded with 11 tons of explosives and high octane gas either exploded in the air or on impact with the ground. Others were killed when they plumetted 6 to 8 kilometres to the ground after their parachutes caught fire from their burning aircraft.

However, Laporte beat the odds and in March 1945, after many dangerous and risky bombing attacks against heavily defended enemy targets he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) for his skill and gallantry.

Later, on another bombing attack against Hagen, his bomber was so badly damaged, he he and his crew were forced to bail out. For his courage, coolness and resolve, during this dangerous situation, he was awarded a second DFC. His citation reads in part as follows:

« …The target was successfully attacked, but whilst photographs of the bombing were taken, the aircraft was hit several times by anti-aircraft fire. A little later the bomber was engaged by two enemy fighters. The enemy came in with guns blazing. Flight Lieutenant Laporte’s aircraft was struck by a stream of bullets. Considerable damage was sustained.

The starboard engine burst into flames. A fire commenced in the fuselage but it was extinguished by a member of the crew. Unfortunately the flames in the burning engine could not be controlled. It became imperative to abandon the aircraft. Flight Lieutenant Laporte gave the necessary order.

Ammunition was exploding intermittently as his comrades jumped. In these harassing moments, Flight Lieutenant Laporte, who had been struck by a bullet which passed through both his elbows, displayed great coolness, remaining at the controls until his crew members were clear. As he was preparing to leave, an explosion occurred. F/L Laporte was thrown to the floor. He got clear of the debris, however and jumped to safety. »

Here also

L’équipage de Norm Brousseau

Un ajout intéressant à un ancien article.

8Ne  e belle claire photo de l’équipage de Norm Brosseau.

PL-15998-1

Norm Brousseau au centre

Archives

 

Norm Brousseau a reçu  une DFC.

J’ajoute deux photos à sa citation  où on y raconte le crash.

BROUSSEAU, P/O Joseph Henri Normand (J17601)

– Distinguished Flying Cross

– No.425 Squadron

– Award effective 21 October 1943 as per London Gazette dated 29 October 1943 and AFRO 2457/43 dated 26 November 1943.

Born September 1921. Home at Cap de la Madeleine; enlisted Montreal, 29 May 1941 and posted to No.4 Manning Depot. To No.3 ITS, 8 August 1941; graduated and promoted LAC, 25 September 1941 when posted to No.4 EFTS; graduated 20 November 1941 when posted to No.9 SFTS; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 10 April 1942.

To “Y” Depot, 11 April 1942.

To RAF overseas, 30 April 1942. Award sent by registered mail 30 September 1948. Rejoined RCAF Auxiliary in Montreal, 10 October 1949 as pilot, No.438 Squadron (110148); retired 2 March 1954.

Pilot Officer Brousseau as captain of aircraft has participated in a large number of successful sorties at night against heavily defended targets in German and Italian territory. Throughout his operational career this officer has been conspicuous for his devotion to duty and his exceptional coolness and courage in hazardous circumstances.

Note:

Incident with Wellington BJ918 at Dishforth airfield. On 28th February 1943 the crew of this aircraft were in the process of taking off for an operational flight to St.Nazaire when the starboard engine failed on take off. The pilot made a rough landing near, what was then known as, Dishforth Crossroads, around a mile south of the airfield at 18.05hrs.

crash Wellington Fontaine

The crew escaped injury and the bomb load did not explode.

crash Wellington Fontaine bombe 4000

Pilot – Sgt Joseph Henry Normand Brousseau RCAF, of Cap de Madeleine, Quebec, Canada;

Navigator – Sgt Joseph Hubert Moreau RCAF;

Wireless Operator – Sgt John D L Fontaine/Fontain RCAF, of Rosemount, Quebec, Canada;

Bomb Aimer or Wireless Operator, F/O Dennis Bertram James Hodgetts RAFVR (123849), of Birmingham;

Air Gunner , Sgt Joseph Alfred Henri Bernard “Ben” Marceau RCAF, of Montreal, Quebec, Canada;

Air Gunner or Bomb Aimer – P/O Thomas Robert Clifford « Cliff » Irwin RCAF (J/22523), of St. Boniface, Manitoba, Canada.

J’avais trouvé des informations sur le navigateur. Voici des informations sur le mitrailleur arrière Henri Bernard « Ben » Marceau.

Henri Bernard « Ben » Marceau
Sergeant – Rear Gunner
Il vola 34 missions avec l’équipage Normand Brousseau du 9 janvier 1943 à Dishforth jusqu’au 28 juillet 1943 à Kairouan en Tunisie. Présent le 28 février 1943 à Dishforth lors du crash de leur Wellington transportant une bombe de 4000 lbs. Du 4 août au 11 août 1943, il vola 4 missions additionnelles avec le commandant du 425, Jos. St-Pierre, toujours à Kairouan. Instructeur-moniteur en Angleterre à partir de novembre 1943.

Dans le Montréal Matin – édition du samedi 12 août 1944

Moniteur, et non élève
« La dernière fois qu’on a parlé de moi dans les journaux, j’ai passé pour un élève alors que je suis moniteur. » nous a déclaré le sous lieutenant d’aviation Bernard Marceau, 3422 rue Iberville, Montréal. Nous lui avons donc promis que les journaux feraient la correction. En Angleterre depuis le 24 juin 1942, Bernard Marceau est moniteur à cette école préparatoire depuis novembre 1943. Cet autre vétéran des « Alouettes » aime bien l’Angleterre. « Ce n’est pas comme chez nous, dit-il, mais ça passe. »

PL-28907-1

Ben Marceau au centre, Charles Boucher de Grosbois est à gauche

Dans LA PATRIE du lundi 14 août 1944 on ajoute le texte suivant:

Marceau a vu la mort de près au cours d’un atterrissage forcé. Son avion est venu s’écraser sur le sol mais la bombe de 4,000 livres qu’il portait sous la carlingue « oublia » d’éclater. Personne n’a été blessé. Le 2 août 1943, Marceau eut une autre expérience au-dessus de Naples. Son avion était pris dans les faisceaux des projecteurs et criblé de balles. Voyant cela, Marceau vola en rase-mottes et ouvrit le feu sur les phares qu’il éteignit aussitôt. Après cela, il put poursuivre sa route.

Note (Marceau n’était pas pilote, mais mitrailleur arrière du Wellington)

PL-15998-1

Ben Marceau à droite

Archives

KW-R

Ça m’a pris un an avant de trouver mon erreur…

george-tremblay-rcaf-plane-3.jpg

KW-R

C’est le Lancaster X de l’équipage de Laporte qui atterrit à Scoudouc au Nouveau-Brunswick. Cette photo est celle de la collection de Georges Tremblay, l’ami de Coco Morin.

George Tremblay 1944

Vous connaissez l’histoire de Georges et de Coco Morin. Elle est sur ce blogue. Le KW-S d’Eddy Marcoux est aussi revenu avec tous les autres au Canada après un long voyage au-dessus de l’Atlantique.

équipage de Marcoux

Coco avait cette photo dans son album.

Samson

Lancaster X – KW-S

Georges avait celle-ci.

George  RCAF plane photo

Lancaster X – KW-S

Collection Georges Tremblay

Ici on a le PT-R.

Avro Lancaster X - Rabbit's Stew - équipage Roland Laporte

J’avais toujours pensé qu’on avait le KW-R, car Jacques P. Lamontagne était photographié avec Roland Laporte et un autre aviateur.

Jacques P Lamontagne 001

Clarence Simonsen avait la réponse…, mais je passais mon temps à l’obstiner.

wpid-1_1747_al-davies-kb882-may-45

Rabbit’s Stew PT-R du 420 Squadron

Je vais lui écrire et lui dire.

Et le voyage de retour du KW-R? Jacques P. Lamontagne avait tout écrit dans son log book.

Jacques P. Lamontagne 053

LE PETIT JOURNAL, 22 juillet 1945 – Prise 2

Voici toute l’histoire.

IMG_9861

LE PETIT JOURNAL, 22 juillet 1945

Hautes décorations à un brave

Le chef d’escadrille Laporte a par 3 fois, sauvé son équipage de la mort

« Sans la bravoure et le courage du chef d’escadrille Roland Laporte, nous serions morts au moins trois fois! » Voilà ce que nous a déclaré l’officier-pilote Jacques Lamontagne, sans-filiste à bord du bombardier du chef d’escadrille Laporte. Et, les autres membres de l’équipage d’ajouter: « Oui, nous lui devons la vie et il a bien mérité ses décorations et ses grades. Nous sommes fiers de servir sous un tel chef. »

Septembre 1939

Né à Montréal le 3 février 1918 du mariage d’Émile Laporte et Yvonne Laporte, il fit ses études à Montréal et quelques années plus tard, soit dès les premiers jours du conflit, en septembre 1939, il s’engagea comme volontaire dans l’aviation canadienne comme simple aviateur.

Il étudia pour devenir mécanicien mais le jeune Laporte avait de l’ambition: il voulait se marler et devenir pilote. Il épousa donc Mary Leblanc, une charmante Acadienne de la Nouvelle-Écosse. Cette dernière mit tout en œuvre pour permettre à son mari de poursuivre ses études afin qu’il obtienne son brevet de pilote commercial. Elle économisa donc le plus possible sur sa solde d’aviateur. Au mois de mars 1941 Roland Laporte recevait le brevet qui devait lui ouvrir les portes de la gloire et des honneurs.

Ses chefs ont remarqué son application à l’étude, son intelligence et son esprit d’initiative et ils lui permirent de suivre des cours d’instructeur de vol à Trenton, Ont., et ainsi le 20 août 1941 il gagnait son premier grade, celui d’officier d’aviation. En novembre de la même année, il était nommé instructeur à St-Hubert, poste qu’il occupa durant un an et demi. Puis il fut transféré au Cap-de-la-Madeleine avec le grade de lieutenant de section et en charge d’une escadrille.

Rêve réalisé

Un an plus tard il réalisa son rêve. On accepta sa demande de rejoindre l’escadrille des « Alouettes », qui se couvrait de gloire. Cependant, Laporte dut retourner à St-Hubert suivre un entrainement préliminaire et le 8 avril 1944 il s’embarquait pour l’Angleterre.

Il passa ses premiers mois outre-mer à suivre un entrainement intensif dans une école de bombardement, puis on lui fournit un équipage, avec lequel il devait se couvrir de gloire.

Au représentant du Petit Journal le chef d’escadrille Laporte a déclaré: « Lorsqu’on m’a confié mon équipage, je ne savais pas la grandeur et le sublime qu’évoque pour moi aujourd’hui ce mot: « équipage », synonyme de franchise, de noblesse, de camaraderie et de générosité réciproque.

Durant trois mois mes Compagnons et moi nous nous entrainâmes afin de bien nous connaître et nous comprendre.

Roland Laporte

Le chef d’escadrille Roland Laporte, de Montréal, qui a reçu la Distinguished Flying Cross deux fois en moins de 15 jours, à la suite d’actes des plus héroïques.

« Et aujourd’hui, après avoir bataillé ensemble, après avoir vécu ensemble des cauchemars, nous retournons, et lorsque nous serons démobilisés, ensemble nous nous aiderons. Notre vie d’équipage, monsieur, c’est pour la vie maintenant, dans les bons comme dans les mauvais jours. »

Ces simples phrases, le chef d’escadrille Laporte les avaient prononcées d’une voix sourde et, dans le regard de ses compagnons de gloire, on remarquait la même détermination, la même ténacité et la même foi dans « l’équipage ». Ces hommes ne se laisseront plus, on en a la ferme conviction.

Après avoir subi un dernier entraînement de commandos durant un mois et demi, l’équipage était prêt à affronter l’ennemi. Le 28 décembre 1944, il quittait pour la première fois le sol de l’Angleterre en direction de Cologne pour en bombarder les voies ferroviaires. Tous avaient le sourire aux lèvres, mais le cœur un peu gros. Surtout en voyant défiler sous leurs yeux les campagnes de France qui ressemblent tellement à celles de chez nous.

Des coups de canons! Des nuages blancs! C’était la D.C.A. allemande. Cela tranquillisa les membres de l’équipage. Tous reprirent leur sang-froid. Le bombardement eut lieu, l’équipage retourna à sa base. Treize fois on recommença et chaque fois l’équipage revenait heureux d’avoir atteint l’objectif et ainsi d’avoir déjoué l’ennemi.

Haute décoration

« C’était trop beau, » de nous dire l’officier pilote Lamontagne. « Au quatorzième tour, nous avions l’ordre de bombarder les centres ferroviaires de Chemnitz, au sud-ouest de Berlin. Et c’est à la suite de ce raid que notre chef reçut sa Distinguished Flying Cross. »

À ce moment du récit l’équipage entier voulait raconter l’aventure afin de mettre plus en valeur le rôle incontestablement héroïque de Roland Laporte. Avec modestie ce dernier se récusa et, voyant pour une fois que son équipage n’était pas d’accord avec lui, il s’excusa, prétextant un appel téléphonique, ceci afin de ne pas entendre les éloges que ses hommes désiraient nous communiquer.

Le sous-lieutenant d’aviation Rodrigue prit la parole au nom de tous. Très calmement il nous relata avec sobriété l’héroïque équipée suivante:

« Comme Jacques vient de vous le dire, nous devions nous rendre au sud de Chemnitz, mais dès que nous eûmes quitté les côtes anglaises, un de nos moteurs s’arrêta. Notre devoir était de retourner en arrière car la distance qui nous restait à parcourir, aller et retour, était de 18,050 milles. Personne d’entre nous ne désirait revenir en arrière, cela aurait été trop malheureux que des Canadiens français ne puissent pas remplir la mission confiée. Et, comme le lieutenant d’aviation Laporte avait résumé la pensée de tous en disant: « Trois moteurs fonctionnent encore, » nous avons continué notre route.

« Malheureusement en passant au-dessus des côtes de France nos appareils de bord se détraquèrent, moins un compas. Cela suffisait pour me guider mais à contre-coeur j’avertis le lieutenant Laporte du désastre. Il me répondit: « On y va ». Alors, heureux, nous fonçâmes sur l’objectif.

« L’ennemi nous attendait de pied ferme. D.C.A., chasseurs et plongeurs s’étaient donné le mot pour nous descendre. Car, les chameaux! ils s’apercevaient que nous n’avions que trois moteurs. À ce moment nous étions seuls pour faire le raid, les autres étaient retournés à la base. Notre moteur mort était la cause de notre retard et l’ennemi en profitait. Cependant nous avions confiance en l’équipage et au lieutenant de section Laporte qui malgré un travail harassant blaguait sur le tir de nos mitrailleurs. Il taquinait St-Onge en lui demandant s’il pratiquait le dessin en mitraillant l’ennemi. Mais le nombre de ces derniers augmentait et nous avons dû descendre dans les nuages, y demeurer durant quatre heures afin de les dépister. Ce raid, qui devait durer huit heures, nous en prit neuf, mais nous avions bombardé l’objectif et, de plus, le chef avait sauvé l’appareil. Voilà ce qui lui a valu sa Distinguished Flying Cross. »

équipage de Laporte

Voici équipage du chef d’escadrille Laporte. De gauche à droite, on remarque: l’officier-pilote Laurent Véronneau, de St-Hughes, Québec, quI servait comme mitrailleur, ainsi que le sergent-major R. St-Onge, de Montréal; le sous-lieutenant d’aviation P. Rodrigue, de Montréal, agissait comme navigateur; le chef d’escadrille Roland Laporte (dans le temps lieutenant de section), le lieutenant d’aviation Jack Foley, d’Ottava, comme bombardier; le sergent R. Arcand, des Trois-Rivières, Québec, qui agissait comme ingénieur et qui disparut dans un raid; l’officier-pilote Jacques Lamontagne, de Montréal, comme sans-filiste. Cet équipage a combattu durant près d’un an dans le ciel de l’Europe.

Bombardier en flammes

Puis, Jacques Lamontagne d’enchaîner: « Maintenant, si vous le voulez bien, avant que le chef d’escadrille soit de retour, je vais vous conter un autre fait qui prouve son sang-froid et sa force morale peu commune:

« Une autre section des Alouettes devait se rendre sur Hagen, dans la Ruhr. Au dernier moment nous apprenons qu’un équipage ne peut monter, car l’un de ses membres est gravement malade. Nous partons afin d’obtenir la permission de voler à la place de cet équipage. Nous avons eu beaucoup de difficulté à obtenir cette permission, car déjà nous avions six raids accomplis dans le même mois, alors qu’on ne peut ordinairement voler que quatre fois. Avec 20 minutes de retard sur les autres, nous décollons pour notre septième raid dans le même mois. Nous avons rejoint le gros de l’escadrille sur le Rhin, mais un bombardier de la section ne nous avait pas vu et il fonce sur nous. Avec calme Laporte évite l’accident au grand soulagement de tous.

« Puis nous sommes entrés dans le bal, et quel bal! La D.C.A. allemande tirait juste. Elle nous a craché un obus dans le fuselage, mais nous avons tenu ferme en prenant le temps de jeter nos bombes. En revenant vers notre base, des Junkers 88 nous attaquèrent dans le ciel belge, notre moteur d’extrême droite prit feu et des balles traversèrent la carlingue, cependant personne ne fut blessé. Laporte réussit à nous sortir de là. Mais, quelques minutes plus tard, nous devions subir une autre attaque. Cette fois le bombardier prit feu et, malgré l’héroïque travail de notre ingénieur, qui, même blessé, fit des efforts surhumains pour éteindre l’incendie, sa bravoure, hélas! ne fut pas récompensée car l’autre moteur droit sauta. Laporte, blessé aux coudes, donna à tous l’ordre de sauter en parachute. »

À ce moment St-Onge interrompit Lamontagne pour ajouter: « Il était 21 h 18, je m’en souviens, j’ai regardé ma montre en sautant en parachute. »

Et Lamontagne de continuer son récit: « Nous fûmes tous rescapés par des Américains qui nous prodiguèrent les premiers soins. Le lendemain nous avons appris, avec beaucoup de peine, que notre pauvre camarade Arcand n’avait pas…

Et Lamontagne de continuer son récit: « Nous fûmes tous rescapés par des Américains qui nous prodiguèrent les premiers soins. Le lendemain nous avons appris, avec beaucoup de peine, que notre pauvre camarade Arcand n’avait pas…été retrouvé. Nous nous rendîmes alors dans la petite église de ce village belge afin de prier pour notre camarade Arcand, si chic type et si brave. En sortant nous avions un peu de poussière dans nos yeux…

Les Américains nous transportèrent à Bruxelles et de là nous revinrent en Angleterre, pour recevoir trois semaines de vacances, Nous étions heureux, mais le comble de notre bonheur, ce fut lorsque nous apprîmes que notre chef d’escadrille venait de recevoir un agrafe à sa Distinguished Flying Cross. Les Canadiens français qui ont reçu la Distinguished Flying Cross deux fois sont rares, mais bien plus rares sont les pilotes qui l’ont reçue en moins de 15 jours. » Nous avons appris que deux autres raids furent effectués par cet équipage de héros avant l’armistice, puis ce fut l’entraînement pour Ia traversée de l’océan afin de revenir au pays.

Avant de quitter l’équipage, les hommes du chef d’escadrille Laporte ont prié le représentant du Petit Journal d’écrire une dernière fois combien ils doivent la vie à leur chef. Et tous de déclarer: « Quand les choses allaient mal, que nous avions de la misère dans l’accomplissement de nos mission, nous regardions le chef, et son calme et sa force morale nous encourageaient à tenir le coup. Nous lui devons la vie. 5a femme et ses enfante doivent être heureux d’avoir un héros aussi brave. aussi chic, aussi bon que lui. »

La prochaine fois, une photo inédite de l’atterrissage de Laporte à Scoudouc au Nouveau-Brunswick en juin 1945.

Le Petit Journal – Le 22 juillet 1945

IMG_9861

LE PETIT JOURNAL, 22 juillet 1945

Hautes décorations à un brave

Le chef d’escadrille Laporte a par 3 fois, sauvé son équipage de la mort

« Sans la bravoure et le courage du chef d’escadrille Roland Laporte, nous serions morts au moins trois fois! » Voilà ce que nous a déclaré l’officier-pilote Jacques Lamontagne, sans-filiste à bord du bombardier du chef d’escadrille Laporte. Et, les autres membres de l’équipage d’ajouter: « Oui, nous lui devons la vie et il a bien mérité ses décorations et ses grades. Nous sommes fiers de servir sous un tel chef. »

Septembre 1939

Né à Montréal le 3 février 1918 du mariage d’Émile Laporte et Yvonne Laporte, il fit ses études à Montréal et quelques années plus tard, soit dès les premiers jours du conflit, en septembre 1939, il s’engagea comme volontaire dans l’aviation canadienne comme simple aviateur.

Il étudia pour devenir mécanicien mais le jeune Laporte avait de l’ambition: il voulait se marler et devenir pilote. Il épousa donc Mary Leblanc, une charmante Acadienne de la Nouvelle-Écosse. Cette dernière mit tout en œuvre pour permettre à son mari de poursuivre ses études afin qu’il obtienne son brevet de pilote commercial. Elle économisa donc le plus possible sur sa solde d’aviateur. Au mois de mars 1941 Roland Laporte recevait le brevet qui devait lui ouvrir les portes de la gloire et des honneurs.

Ses chefs ont remarqué son application à l’étude, son intelligence et son esprit d’initiative et ils lui permirent de suivre des cours d’instructeur de vol à Trenton, Ont., et ainsi le 20 août 1941 il gagnait son premier grade, celui d’officier d’aviation. En novembre de la même année, il était nommé instructeur à St-Hubert, poste qu’il occupa durant un an et demi. Puis il fut transféré au Cap-de-la-Madeleine avec le grade de lieutenant de section et en charge d’une escadrille.

Rêve réalisé

Un an plus tard il réalisa son rêve. On accepta sa demande de rejoindre l’escadrille des « Alouettes », qui se couvrait de gloire. Cependant, Laporte dut retourner à St-Hubert suivre un entrainement préliminaire et le 8 avril 1944 il s’embarquait pour l’Angleterre.

Il passa ses premiers mois outre-mer à suivre un entrainement intensif dans une école de bombardement, puis on lui fournit un équipage, avec lequel il devait se couvrir de gloire.

Au représentant du Petit Journal le chef d’escadrille Laporte a déclaré: « Lorsqu’on m’a confié mon équipage, je ne savais pas la grandeur et le sublime qu’évoque pour moi aujourd’hui ce mot: « équipage », synonyme de franchise, de noblesse, de camaraderie et de générosité réciproque.

Durant trois mois mes Compagnons et moi nous nous entrainâmes afin de bien nous connaître et nous comprendre.

Roland Laporte

Le chef d’escadrille Roland Laporte, de Montréal, qui a reçu la Distinguished Flying Cross deux fois en moins de 15 jours, à la suite d’actes des plus héroïques.

« Et aujourd’hui, après avoir bataillé ensemble, après avoir vécu ensemble des cauchemars, nous retournons, et lorsque nous serons démobilisés, ensemble nous nous aiderons. Notre vie d’équipage, monsieur, c’est pour la vie maintenant, dans les bons comme dans les mauvais jours. »

Ces simples phrases, le chef d’escadrille Laporte les avaient prononcées d’une voix sourde et, dans le regard de ses compagnons de gloire, on remarquait la même détermination, la même ténacité et la même foi dans « l’équipage ». Ces hommes ne se laisseront plus, on en a la ferme conviction.

Après avoir subi un dernier entraînement de commandos durant un mois et demi, l’équipage était prêt à affronter l’ennemi. Le 28 décembre 1944, il quittait pour la première fois le sol de l’Angleterre en direction de Cologne pour en bombarder les voies ferroviaires. Tous avaient le sourire aux lèvres, mais le cœur un peu gros. Surtout en voyant défiler sous leurs yeux les campagnes de France qui ressemblent tellement à celles de chez nous.

Des coups de canons! Des nuages blancs! C’était la D.C.A. allemande. Cela tranquillisa les membres de l’équipage. Tous reprirent leur sang-froid. Le bombardement eut lieu, l’équipage retourna à sa base. Treize fois on recommença et chaque fois l’équipage revenait heureux d’avoir atteint l’objectif et ainsi d’avoir déjoué l’ennemi.

Haute décoration

« C’était trop beau, » de nous dire l’officier pilote Lamontagne. « Au quatorzième tour, nous avions l’ordre de bombarder les centres ferroviaires de Chemnitz, au sud-ouest de Berlin. Et c’est à la suite de ce raid que notre chef reçut sa Distinguished Flying Cross. »

À ce moment du récit l’équipage entier voulait raconter l’aventure afin de mettre plus en valeur le rôle incontestablement héroïque de Roland Laporte. Avec modestie ce dernier se récusa et, voyant pour une fois que son équipage n’était pas d’accord avec lui, il s’excusa, prétextant un appel téléphonique, ceci afin de ne pas entendre les éloges que ses hommes désiraient nous communiquer.

Le sous-lieutenant d’aviation Rodrigue prit la parole au nom de tous. Très calmement il nous relata avec sobriété l’héroïque équipée suivante:

« Comme Jacques vient de vous le dire, nous devions nous rendre au sud de Chemnitz, mais dès que nous eûmes quitté les côtes anglaises, un de nos moteurs s’arrêta. Notre devoir était de retourner en arrière car la distance qui nous restait à parcourir, aller et retour, était de 18,050 milles. Personne d’entre nous ne désirait revenir en arrière, cela aurait été trop malheureux que des Canadiens français ne puissent pas remplir la mission confiée. Et, comme le lieutenant d’aviation Laporte avait résumé la pensée de tous en disant: « Trois moteurs fonctionnent encore, » nous avons continué notre route.

« Malheureusement en passant au-dessus des côtes de France nos appareils de bord se détraquèrent, moins un compas. Cela suffisait pour me guider mais à contre-coeur j’avertis le lieutenant Laporte du désastre. Il me répondit: « On y va ». Alors, heureux, nous fonçâmes sur l’objectif.

« L’ennemi nous attendait de pied ferme. D.C.A., chasseurs et plongeurs s’étaient donné le mot pour nous descendre. Car, les chameaux! ils s’apercevaient que nous n’avions que trois moteurs. À ce moment nous étions seuls pour faire le raid, les autres étaient retournés à la base. Notre moteur mort était la cause de notre retard et l’ennemi en profitait. Cependant nous avions confiance en l’équipage et au lieutenant de section Laporte qui malgré un travail harassant blaguait sur le tir de nos mitrailleurs. Il taquinait St-Onge en lui demandant s’il pratiquait le dessin en mitraillant l’ennemi. Mais le nombre de ces derniers augmentait et nous avons dû descendre dans les nuages, y demeurer durant quatre heures afin de les dépister. Ce raid, qui devait durer huit heures, nous en prit neuf, mais nous avions bombardé l’objectif et, de plus, le chef avait sauvé l’appareil. Voilà ce qui lui a valu sa Distinguished Flying Cross. »

équipage de Laporte

Voici équipage du chef d’escadrille Laporte. De gauche à droite, on remarque: l’officier-pilote Laurent Véronneau, de St-Hughes, Québec, quI servait comme mitrailleur, ainsi que le sergent-major R. St-Onge, de Montréal; le sous-lieutenant d’aviation P. Rodrigue, de Montréal, agissait comme navigateur; le chef d’escadrille Roland Laporte (dans le temps lieutenant de section), le lieutenant d’aviation Jack Foley, d’Ottava, comme bombardier; le sergent R. Arcand, des Trois-Rivières, Québec, qui agissait comme ingénieur et qui disparut dans un raid; l’officier-pilote Jacques Lamontagne, de Montréal, comme sans-filiste. Cet équipage a combattu durant près d’un an dans le ciel de l’Europe.

Bombardier en flammes

Puis, Jacques Lamontagne d’enchaîner: « Maintenant, si vous le voulez bien, avant que le chef d’escadrille soit de retour, je vais vous conter un autre fait qui prouve son sang-froid et sa force morale peu commune:

« Une autre section des Alouettes devait se rendre sur Hagen, dans la Ruhr. Au dernier moment nous apprenons qu’un équipage ne peut monter, car l’un de ses membres est gravement malade. Nous partons afin d’obtenir la permission de voler à la place de cet équipage. Nous avons eu beaucoup de difficulté à obtenir cette permission, car déjà nous avions six raids accomplis dans le même mois, alors qu’on ne peut ordinairement voler que quatre fois. Avec 20 minutes de retard sur les autres, nous décollons pour notre septième raid dans le même mois. Nous avons rejoint le gros de l’escadrille sur le Rhin, mais un bombardier de la section ne nous avait pas vu et il fonce sur nous. Avec calme Laporte évite l’accident au grand soulagement de tous.

« Puis nous sommes entrés dans le bal, et quel bal! La D.C.A. allemande tirait juste. Elle nous a craché un obus dans le fuselage, mais nous avons tenu ferme en prenant le temps de jeter nos bombes. En revenant vers notre base, des Junkers 88 nous attaquèrent dans le ciel belge, notre moteur d’extrême droite prit feu et des balles traversèrent la carlingue, cependant personne ne fut blessé. Laporte réussit à nous sortir de là. Mais, quelques minutes plus tard, nous devions subir une autre attaque. Cette fois le bombardier prit feu et, malgré l’héroïque travail de notre ingénieur, qui, même blessé, fit des efforts surhumains pour éteindre l’incendie, sa bravoure, hélas! ne fut pas récompensée car l’autre moteur droit sauta. Laporte, blessé aux coudes, donna à tous l’ordre de sauter en parachute. »

À ce moment St-Onge interrompit Lamontagne pour ajouter: « Il était 21 h 18, je m’en souviens, j’ai regardé ma montre en sautant en parachute. »

Et Lamontagne de continuer son récit: « Nous fûmes tous rescapés par des Américains qui nous prodiguèrent les premiers soins. Le lendemain nous avons appris, avec beaucoup de peine, que notre pauvre camarade Arcand n’avait pas…

(Suite à la page 36)

Laurent n’a pas la suite de l’article… mais on en connaît déjà beaucoup grâce à son père.

Jacques P. Lamontagne 047

À suivre…

LE PETIT JOURNAL 1945-07-22_03 extrait

 Voici la suite en format texte…

Et Lamontagne de continuer son récit: « Nous fûmes tous rescapés par des Américains qui nous prodiguèrent les premiers soins. Le lendemain nous avons appris, avec beaucoup de peine, que notre pauvre camarade Arcand n’avait pas…été retrouvé. Nous nous rendîmes alors dans la petite église de ce village belge afin de prier pour notre camarade Arcand, si chic type et si brave. En sortant nous avions un peu de poussière dans nos yeux…

Les Américains nous transportèrent à Bruxelles et de là nous revinrent en Angleterre, pour recevoir trois semaines de vacances, Nous étions heureux, mais le comble de notre bonheur, ce fut lorsque nous apprîmes que notre chef d’escadrille venait de recevoir un agrafe à sa Distinguished Flying Cross. Les Canadiens français qui ont reçu la Distinguished Flying Cross deux fois sont rares, mais bien plus rares sont les pilotes qui l’ont reçue en moins de 15 jours. » Nous avons appris que deux autres raids furent effectués par cet équipage de héros avant l’armistice, puis ce fut l’entraînement pour Ia traversée de l’océan afin de revenir au pays.

Avant de quitter l’équipage, les hommes du chef d’escadrille Laporte ont prié le représentant du Petit Journal d’écrire une dernière fois combien ils doivent la vie à leur chef. Et tous de déclarer: « Quand les choses allaient mal, que nous avions de la misère dans l’accomplissement de nos mission, nous regardions le chef, et son calme et sa force morale nous encourageaient à tenir le coup. Nous lui devons la vie. 5a femme et ses enfante doivent être heureux d’avoir un héros aussi brave. aussi chic, aussi bon que lui. »