Jerry Moreau – 40 missions

Voici ce qu’on retrouve sur le site Airforce. ca à propos de Norm Brousseau.

Navigator – Sgt J H Moreau RCAF (Possibly Gerald or Jerry Moreau RCAF);

Est-ce le même navigateur qui a survécu à l’écrasement du Wellington?

crash Wellington Fontaine

Mais non finalement.

Au début, je pensais que oui.

Voici l’avis de décès de Joseph Gérard Arthur MOREAU, un navigateur du 425 Alouette.

Joseph Gerard Arthur MOREAU
Nom : MOREAU
Prénom : Joseph Gerard Arthur
Date de décès : 2000-05-31
Paru le : 2000-06-03
Père : MOREAU
Mère :
Conjoint(e)(s) : Elizabeth -

MOREAU Joseph-Gerard-Arthur (Jerry), born September 27, 1921, passed away peacefully on May 31, 2000. Lovingly remembered by his devoted wife of 13 years, Elizabeth; son David; three daughters, Margaret, Bethany, Vivian; grandchildren, Geoffrey, Jeremy, Jennifer, Andre, Larissa, Ceileidh, Elizabeth; as well as two sisters, Gertrude, Edwilda; and two brothers, Eugene and Lucien. Jerry served in the RCAF in WW II, and received the DFC. He was a navigator on a Halifax with 425 Alouettes. He was an enterprising and hard working businessman. He was a proud father and grandfather. A memorial service will be held Tuesday, June 6, 2000 at 1:30 p.m. at Christian Life Assembly, 21277 – 56th Ave., Langley, BC (by airport). Cremation.
The family wishes to express sincere appreciation to the care staff at Rosewood Extended Care Hospital. Henderson’s Langley (604) 530-6488.

Jerry Moreau a aussi reçu une DFC, ce qui nous pemet d’en savoir un petit peu plus sur ce navigateur…

MOREAU, F/O Joseph Gerard Arthur (J90558)

- Distinguished Flying Cross

- No.425 Squadron

- Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 25 September 1945 and AFRO 1768/45 dated 23 November 1945.

Born 27 September 1921 in North Bay, Ontario; home there (acid operator); enlisted in Toronto, 25 August 1942. To No.1 Manning Depot, 18 September 1942. To No.14 SFTS (guard duty), 23 November 1942. To No.6 ITS, 6 March 1943; graduated and promoted LAC, 28 May 1943; to No.1 AOS, 12 June 1943; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 29 October 1943.

To “Y” Depot, 12 November 1943; taken on strength of No.3 PRC, Bournemouth, 23 November 1943. Commissioned 9 October 1944. Promoted Flying Officer, 9 April 1945. Repatriated 14 May 1945. To No.1 Air Command, 27 May 1945. To No.14 SFTS, 27 June 1945. To No.4 Release Centre, 27 July 1945. Released 3 August 1945.

Medal presented in Vancouver, 22 October 1949 when living in Prince George. Died in Langley, British Columbia, 28 May 2000.

In September 1944, this officer was navigator of an aircraft detailed to attack a target in the Ruhr Valley. Before the target was reached on of the engines failed, causing the aircraft to lose height considerably. Despite this, Flying Officer Moreau, with great determination and skill, successfully navigated the aircraft to the target through heavy anti-aircraft fire. The mission was completed and the crew made a safe return to base. This officer, on all operations, has shown courage and outstanding devotion to duty.

DHH file 181.009 D.2618 (Library and Archives Canada RG.24 Volume 20627) has recommendation drafted 18 April 1945 by W/C Hugh Ledoux; he had then flown 40 sorties (225 hours 15 minutes). Submission as follows:

10 September 1944 – Le Havre (4.30)
11 September 1944 – Castrop Rauxel (5.25)
12 September 1944 – Wanne Eickel (5.00)
13 September 1944 – Osnabruck (4.25)
15 September 1944 – Kiel (4.40, duty not carried out)
17 September 1944 – Boulogne (4.00)
6 October 1944 – Dortmund (2.15, duty not carried out)
9 October 1944 – Bochum (6.40)
12 October 1944 – Wanne Eickel (5.25)
14 October 1944 – Duisburg (5.40)
15 October 1944 – Wilhelmshaven (5.00)
23 October 1944 – Essen (5.55)
25 October 1944 – Homburg (5.15)
28 October 1944 – Cologne (5.45)
30 October 1944 – Cologne (6.05)
1 November 1944 – Oberhausen (5.55)
2 November 1944 – Dusseldorf (3.25, duty not carried out)
4 November 1944 – Bochum (5.20)
6 November 1944 – Gelsenkirchen (5.25)
18 November 1944 – Julich (6.35)
4 December 1944 – Karlsruhe (6.45)
5 December 1944 – Soest (6.45)
6 December 1944 – Osnabruck (1.40, duty not carried out)
18 December 1944 – Duisburg (3.00, duty not carried out)
24 December 1944 – Dusseldorf (4.40)
29 December 1944 – Trois Dorf (6.45)
30 December 1944 – Cologne (6.40)
6 January 1945 – Hanau (7.00)
1 February 1945 – Mainz (6.35)
2 February 1945 – Wanne Eickel (6.25)
4 February 1945 – Osterfeld (6.05)
7 February 1945 – Goch (6.20)
9 February 1945 – Wanne Eickel (6.35)
13 February 1945 – Bohlen Leipzig (7.55)
17 February 1945 – Wesel (7.00)
20 February 1945 – Monheim (7.00)
23 February 1945 – Essen (6.10)
27 February 1945 – Mainz (6.50)
1 March 1945 – Mannheim (7.05)

On September 11th, 1944, the crew of which Pilot Officer Moreau is navigator was detailed to carry out a daylight raid on Castrop-Rauxel in the Rhur Valley, Germany.

Before reaching the target, trouble developed in the starboard outer engine. The pilot had to feather it. As a result of this, height was lost and air speed could be maintained with the greatest difficulty. Despite the loss of one engine, the crew carried on to the target through heavy and predicted flak barrages which resulted in the aircraft being completely riddled.

Pilot Officer Moreau navigated the crippled aircraft to the target with precision and bombed most successfully. On the return journey, the bomber stream was lost due to the decreased speed, but the base was reached with no further incident.

Throughout his forty sorties over enemy territory, Pilot Officer Moreau has shown a keen devotion to duty and an unshakeable determination to drive home a successful attack. His outstanding example is worthy of emulation and high praise. I therefore strongly recommend that this officer’s gallantry be recognized by the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

40 missions!

On ne mentionne pas celle de l’écrasement du Wellington le 1er mars 1943.

Pas surprenant car ce navigateur n’est pas le même, car il n’arrive en Angleterre que le 23 novembre 1943.

To “Y” Depot, 12 November 1943; taken on strength of No.3 PRC, Bournemouth, 23 November 1943.

Il faut toujours vérifier ses sources, mais ça vous le savez déjà si vous lisez ce blogue.

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